Fitness Workouts
You are here :  Home
Search
 
Close
Visitor Counter

 358656 visitors

 18 visitors online

World News
Our live Tweets :

Read more Read more...

Close Close

 ↑  
Health News

NHS also removes medication for upset stomachs, haemorrhoids and erectile dysfunction from list of prescribed items Gluten-free food will be on the banned list. Photograph: Martin Argles for the Guardian The NHS is to stop giving patients travel vaccinations, gluten-free foods and some drugs that can be bought over the counter in an attempt to rescue its ailing finances. Simon Stevens, the chief executive of NHS England, announced the changes in an interview with the Daily Mail in which he detailed new efforts to get better value for money so that money saved could instead be spent on promising therapies that have recently been developed. GPs will be told to not prescribe medications such as those for upset stomachs, travel sickness and haemorrhoids in the drive to eliminate waste from the NHS’s £120bn annual budget. Stevens said: “We’ve got to tackle some of the waste which is still in the system. The NHS is a very efficient health service but like every country’s health service there is inefficiency and waste. “There’s £114m being spent on medicine for upset tummies, haemorrhoids, travel sickness, indigestion, [and] and that’s before you get to the £22m-plus on gluten-free that you can also now get at Morrisons, Lidl or Tescos. “Part of what we are trying to do is make sure that we make enough headroom to spend money on innovative new drugs by not wasting it on these kind of items.” Next month, NHS England will start reviewing 10 items that it says are “ineffective, unnecessary [and] inappropriate for prescription on the NHS, or indeed unsafe”, which together cost the service £128m a year. The Department of Health is expected to then issue new guidance advising GPs that they are not prescribed. They include omega 3 and fish oils; the painkiller fentanyl: lidocaine medicated plasters; a tablet used to treat high blood pressure called doxazosin MR; and a drug called tadalafil, which is used to treat erectile dysfunction, along with gluten-free foods and travel vaccines. NHS Clinical Commissioners, which represents England’s 209 NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) – the GP-led bodies that hold health budgets locally – has asked NHS England to look into whether the 10 items are a good use of scarce cash when the NHS is undergoing the tightest budgetary squeeze in its 69-year history. Many other common medications could soon be added to the banned list. NHS England said: “In light of the financial challenges faced by the NHS, further work will consider other medicines which are of relatively low clinical value or priority or are readily available over the counter and in some instances, at far lower cost, such as treatment for coughs and colds, antihistamines, indigestion and heartburn medication and suncream. Guidance will support clinical commissioning groups in making decisions locally about what is prescribed on the NHS.” Frontline doctors said the idea should help the NHS to prioritise spending but they called for safeguards to protect vulnerable groups. Prof Helen Stokes-Lampard, the chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners, said: “We do welcome these proposals but cautiously. I think a blanket ban might well introduce some unfair problems.” Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, she added: “The difficulty is when people don’t pay prescription charges, so they are entitled to free medication on the NHS, and that’s when they’ll be difficult conversations. GPs don’t want to be rationing. It is time that country needs these difficult conversations but we mustn’t put at risk the health of the vulnerable.” Dr Amanda Doyle, the NHS Clinical Commissioners co-chair, said: “The NHS is in quite constrained financial circumstances and what we are trying to do is prioritise our spend. We are currently spending hundreds of millions of pounds on things we would generally consider to be low priority for funding and we are looking at ways of reducing that spending so we can direct the funding in to things that take a higher priority.” But Norman Lamb, the Liberal Democrats’ shadow health secretary, said: “This creeping retreat of the NHS should not be happening without a national discussion about how we can afford a modern, efficient and effective health and care system. We do have to confront tough choices about whether we all pay more or whether the NHS does less but the public should be part of that discussion. And the bottom line is that this is intended to save £1bn over two years when we face a shortfall of over £10bn by 2020. This does not solve the massive problem we face.” NHS bosses hope the moves could ultimately save as much as £400m a year. The service is facing serious financial problems. NHS trusts in England recorded a deficit of £2.45bn last year and are expected to end this financial year almost £1bn in the red again, despite repeated warnings to get their finances in order. An NHS spokesman said: “New guidelines will advise CCGs on the commissioning of medicines generally assessed as low priority and will provide support to clinical commissioning groups, prescribers and dispensers. “The increasing demand for prescriptions for medication that can be bought over the counter at relatively low cost, often for self-limiting or minor conditions, underlines the need for all healthcare professionals to work even closer with patients to ensure the best possible value from NHS resources, whilst eliminating wastage and improving patient outcomes.” Stevens’ money-saving initiative is a foretaste of a major initiative he will unveil on Friday. He will announce details of his long-awaited “delivery plan” to fulfil his pledge, first made in October 2014 in his Five Year Forward View modernisation blueprint, to radically transform how the health service works by 2020 so that it delivers better care and closes the £22bn gap that is expected to open up in its own finances by then in order to remain sustainable. He will give the go-ahead to between six and 10 of the 44 sustainability and transformation plans (STP), one covering each part of England, which are intended to implement his ideas, which centre on moving a lot of care out of hospitals and treating patients closer to home and keeping them healthier so that they avoid expensive £400-a-night unnecessary stays in hospital. The STP plans have proved very controversial because they could see dozens of hospitals lose key services, such as their A&E or maternity unit. The 10 items under review (and cost to NHS) are as follows: • Liothyronine, used to treat underactive thyroid £30.9m • Gluten-free foods £21.9m • Lidocaine plasters, for reducing nerve-pain £17.6m • Tadalafil, for erectile dysfunction £10.5m • Fentanyl, used for terminally ill patients, including those with cancer £10.1m • Co-proxamol, painkiller, £8.3m • Travel vaccines £9.5m • Doxazosin, for high blood pressure, £7.1m • Rubs and ointments £6.4m • Omega 3 and fish oils £5.7m Clinical Commissioning Groups have also suggested savings could be made on other products, including the following*: • Hayfever remedies £37m • Indigestion/heartburn remedies £27m • Suncream £1.4m • Cold and cough remedies £1.2m * Figures taken from NHS Digital’s Prescription Cost Analysis England 2015. Source: The Guardian, UK ...
28/03/2017 @ 8:46 PM
(by The_Guardian)
Moderate drinkers less likely than teetotallers and heavy drinkers to see doctor for heart conditions including angina and strokes caused by blood clots Katie Forster @katieforster Thursday 23 March 2017 00:49 GMT 47 comments A pint a day may keep the doctor away when it comes to some cardiovascular diseases Getty Drinking one pint a day has been linked to reduced risk of developing several serious heart conditions in new large-scale study. Moderate drinking, usually defined as no more than 14 units of alcohol a week – equivalent to around one and a half bottles of wine or seven pints of regular-strength lager – is associated with a lower risk of developing some, but not all, cardiovascular diseases, said scientists. Researchers at the University of Cambridge and University College London analysed electronic health records for nearly two million healthy UK adults. They found moderate drinkers were less likely than teetotallers and heavy drinkers to see a doctor for seven conditions including heart attacks and strokes caused by blood clots. Steven Bell, who led the research, told The Independent there could be a number of possible explanations for the findings. “In terms of biology, people who drink in moderation tend to have lower levels of inflammation, or higher levels of good cholesterol,” he said. “But some people would say these people just tend to be more healthy and socially engaged, and that’s leading to lower levels of different types of heart disease than the drinking itself.” The research, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), adds to already existing evidence that drinking alcohol within recommended limits may reduce the risk of developing heart disease. Dr Bell said the study of 1.93 million adults was “larger than all previous studies when pooled together”. “We linked databases containing patients’ alcohol consumption recorded by GP or practice nurses to disease and test registries,” he said. “One of the advantages of doing this is we were able to create a dataset representative of the general population, at a much larger scale than previous studies.” The scientists used the data to examine the link between alcohol consumption and 12 heart conditions. When compared to moderate drinking, not drinking at all was linked to increased risk of unstable angina, heart attack, sudden coronary death, heart failure, stroke caused by loss of blood flow, abdominal aneurysm and peripheral arterial disease. However it didn’t appear to have an effect on chronic stable angina, cardiac arrest, brain attack (‘mini-stroke’) caused by blood clots or two different types of brain haemorrhage. Dr Bell said the research shouldn't be seen by non-drinkers as a reason to take up drinking alcohol, because there are safer, more effective ways to lower risk of heart disease, such as a healthy diet. Past research has shown an association between moderate drinking and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, but these have been controversial due to the grouping of non-drinkers with former drinkers, who may have stopped due to ill health. To address this, the study separated non-drinkers from former and occasional drinkers. It also focussed on each patient's first visit to a doctor where they were diagnosed with cardiovascular disease. Drinking more than the recommended limits was linked with an increased risk of most of the conditions, but was found to carry a lower risk of heart attack and angina. ​James Nicholls, director of research and policy development at Alcohol Research UK, said the findings “should be taken seriously” and called the study “an important contribution to the evidence on a controversial subject”. “A particular strength of this study is that, because of the numbers involved, the researchers are able to separate out different risks for different heart conditions,” he said.  “The idea that ‘alcohol is good for the heart’ overlooks the fact that there are a wide range of heart conditions and that, knowing what we do about the biological effects of alcohol, the effect of drinking on these conditions should vary.   “This study confirms that alcohol produces different patterns of risk depending whether we are looking at, say, myocardial infarction or angina.” Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in the US said the study “sets the stage for ever larger and more sophisticated studies that will attempt to harness the flood of big data into a stream of useful, reliable, and unbiased findings”. Source: The Independent, UK ...
25/03/2017 @ 8:01 PM
(by The_Independent)
The latest World News

Theresa May is welcomed by European commission president Jean-Claude Juncker in Brussels.Businesses & bankers urged the government to make urgent progress on trade talks after Theresa May secured a “hard won” agreement with the European commission to allow the government to move to the second stage of Brexit negotiations. Sterling was higher against the euro, up 0.2% at €1.1468.

The British Chambers of Commerce also called for more detail early in the new year about the UK’s future trade relationship with the EU. Read more HERE.

Read more Read more...

Theresa May is welcomed by European commission president Jean-Claude Juncker in Brussels.Businesses & bankers urged the government to make urgent progress on trade talks after Theresa May secured a “hard won” agreement with the European commission to allow the government to move to the second stage of Brexit negotiations. Sterling was higher against the euro, up 0.2% at €1.1468.

The British Chambers of Commerce also called for more detail early in the new year about the UK’s future trade relationship with the EU. Read more HERE.

Close Close

Published on 08/12/2017 @ 1:35 PM  - none comment - none comment - View ? Add yours ?   Top
 
Welcome to Tune1st: a Free Online Resource

ABOUT US :

I am a World Citizen (Congolese, French and British), Marathon man and Scientist working in Biotechnology industry. I have initiate this exciting project to share my passions through different above sections. Indeed,  "Tune You First !" is a brand new concept launched since the end of May 2016. We keep constantly improving and updating this website in a daily basis.

We aim to inform, guide and educate a wide range of consumers (babies, pregnant women, Athletes, teenagers, businessmen, adults, online players...)  to provide you with a high quality information in your daily life : health, nutrition, diet, healthy eating, healthy living, healthy life style, sports, fitness, worldwide breaking news, deals- scam & fraud alerts as well as opportunities to help you to earn money online.

All information displayed in this website is from Worldwide reputable medias sources (televisions, Newspapers, Institutions, Social Media, Healthcare & so on) who own the copyright of their content. Many thanks to all of them for their contribution to this fantastic project!

Our Twitter hashtags :  #Fitness, #Nutrition, #Breaking, #Health, #BreakingNews, #News, #Scam, #ScamAlert, #Fraud, #Tune1st

barclay.jpg
tune.jpg
FA.jpg
Newsletter
To receive news about this website, consider subscribing to our Newsletter.
x
1
n
2
W
3
a
4
T
5
g
6
6
7
A
8
Enter the 5-character code above (respecting upper/lower case) according to the positions listed below:
8-5-7-7-8
You are here :  Home
 
Search
 
Close